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WASHINGTON, DC -- Family Research Council (FRC) praised President Trump's decision today rescinding the Obama era transgender policy. A Rasmussen survey released last month finds "just 23% of likely U.S. voters think the U.S. military's decision to allow openly transgender people to serve is good for the military."...
WASHINGTON, D.C. - Today, the Senate agreed to proceed to a debate on H.R. 1628, the House-passed American Health Care Act of 2017. In order for the Senate to debate the important elements of Obamacare's repeal and replacement, senators needed first to support a procedural motion to begin consideration of H.R. 1628. Family Research Council (FRC) scored in favor of the motion to proceed to H.R. 1628. ...
WASHINGTON, D.C. - Today the U.S. Senate released a new draft of the Better Care Reconciliation Act of 2017 (H.R. 1628, "BCRA"). BCRA, for one year, would eliminate more than $390 million (over 86%) of over $450 million in annual federal funding to Planned Parenthood, from all mandatory government spending programs. This is identical to the provision ruled to comply with the Senate's Byrd Rule in 2015. BCRA would also redirect funding to community health centers, which outnumber Planned Parenthood facilities 20 to 1 and offer a wider array of health care services, but not abortion. BCRA also would provide premium credits that may not be used for health care plans that cover elective abortion, a reversal of the massive Obamacare expansion of elective abortion. It also would provide states more funds and flexibility, without subsidizing abortion, to lower healthcare costs, which have risen dramatically under Obamacare, and therefore will provide families more affordable options to obtain healthcare suited to their needs....
Hot to trotA GOOD fit is everything, stylists often counsel, but in assessing its market America's fashion business appears to have mislaid the measuring tape. A frequently-cited study done a few years ago by Plunkett Research, a market-research firm, found that 67% of American women were “plus-size”, meaning size 14 or larger. That figure will not have changed much, but in 2016, only 18% of clothing sold was plus-size, according to NPD Group, another research firm.Designers and retailers have long thought of the plus-size segment as high-risk. Predicting what these customers will buy can be difficult, as they tend to be more cautious about styles. Making larger clothes is more expensive; higher costs for fabric cannot always be passed on to consumers. In turn, plus-size women shopped less because the industry was not serving them well. “We have money but nowhere to spend it,” says Kristine Thompson, who runs a blog called Trendy Curvy and has nearly...Continue reading
ON JULY 12, the Larsen C ice shelf in Antarctica disgorged a chunk of ice the size of Delaware, a small state on America's east coast. America's government seems unfazed by the possibility that such shifts might one day threaten Delaware itself. Its climate defiance grows not only from the power of its fossil-fuel industry and the scepticism of the Republican party, but also from a sense of insulation from the costs of global warming. This confidence is misplaced. New research indicates not only that climate change will impose heavy costs on the American economy, but also that it will exacerbate inequality.Calculating the economic effects of climate change is no simple matter. It means working out how a given increase in global temperature affects local weather conditions; how local weather affects things like mortality and crop yields; how those changes add to or subtract from regional GDP; and how thousands of local-level changes in GDP add up nationally or globally. No...Continue reading
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